Friday, January 31, 2014

James Yang: Left Behind

James Yang’s illustration for The Chronicle of Higher Education accompanies an article about the retreat of US university education from an international scope at a time when the world is becoming more interconnected.

Matt Herring: Think You Know Bond? Think Again!

Matt Herring’s illustrations for The Sunday Mail explore the A-Z of 007 for an article by William Boyd, author of the brand new James Bond Novel, “Solo,” incorporating all the best Bonds of movies past.  For example, A is for Air Travel:

Daniel Horowitz: Europe 14|14

Daniel Horowitz is one of just eight artists chosen for the final round in the Europe 14|14 Festival Poster competition. As 2014 marks the centennial commemoration of the onset of WWI, the poster represents the significance of the war and its legacy for modern Europe.

Molly Jacques: Best of Grand Rapids

Molly Jacques’ ebullient hand lettering spells out exactly what makes the city great, for the cover of Grand Rapids Magazine special “Best of GR” issue.

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Jacob Thomas: Avoiding Addiction

Jacob Thomas illustrated an article on helping your children avoid addiction for the current issue of Scouting Magazine.

John Kachik: Revolt on the Range

John Kachik recreates a historical cowboy protest and strike in early Texas with this illustration  for the March issue of Texas Co-Op Power Magazine.

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Tyler Jacobson: SILA Medals

Tyler Jacobson has been awarded not one, but TWO medals honoring his work from this year’s Society of Illustrators Los Angeles competition. He received the Joseph Morgan Henninger Award of Best of Show for his “Son of Sardaar” painting.

Chris Whetzel: The Unlikeliest Hero

Chris Whetzel’s cover illustration for The Village Voice accompanies an article about inmate rights, with more than a few unexpected twists and precedent-setting turns.

James O’Brien: TB Symposium


James O’Brien created this illustration for the New England TB Symposium, integrating images of the drugs used to treat tuberculosis. The image will be used on their program and posters, as well as mugs and bags.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Bryon Thompson: Flight School

Bryon Thompson created this dynamic floor plan spread for AOPA, the magazine of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, to illustrate a feature on their flight school location and the internal workings of the office space.

Zara Picken: The Final Cut

Zara Picken’s illustrations for American Baby magazine accompany “The Final Cut,” an article in which writer talks about how she loves her family the way it is, but panics when her husband wants a vasectomy.

Jacob Thomas: Fort Worth Weekly

Jacob Thomas illustrated the cover story for Fort Worth Weekly, investigating a little-known facet of the “50 Shades of Grey” phenomenon. Soap maker Jenny Pedroza helped launch one of the biggest books in the history of publishing, but wound up with almost none of the money after being outmaneuvered by a former business partner.

Chris Gash: Stuck with Secrets

Chris Gash illustrated a dark cover story for The Pitch, about the questionable drug cocktail and protocols used in Missouri’s lethal injection of death row inmates and why they are rushing to execute so many prisoners.

Doug Chayka: Making Discoveries

Doug Chayka created two adventurous mixed media illustrations for a feature in the latest issue of Manhattan College Magazine titled, "Making Discoveries," about the school's summer research scholarships.

Monday, January 27, 2014

Brian Stauffer: America on Probation

Brian Stauffer’s latest op ed illustration for the New York Times addresses the difficulties of prison reform, such as high recidivism rates among career criminals.

Elisabeth Alba: The Griffin Series

Elisabeth Alba recently illustrated these four seals for author Philip Williams, who is publishing an epic, operatic science fiction cycle called The Griffin Series. Each seal symbolically represents a specific book. They appear on the covers and as chapter headers inside.

Cheryl Chalmers: The War on Poverty

Cheryl Chalmers created these watercolor portraits of Congressman Paul Ryan and Senator Cory Booker to illustrate The Wall Street Journal "Review" section's cover story, "The War on Poverty." January 25-26, 2014.

Jason Seiler: SILA Award of Excellence

Jason Seiler’s illustration, "Mother Can You Spare a Room," painted for The Wall Street Journal, was given the Patrick Nagel Award of Excellence from the Society of Illustrators L.A. Also accepted into the show was Jason’s portrait of Allan Gurganus painted for The New Yorker.

Thursday, January 23, 2014

Eric Hanson: Match Game

Eric Hanson’s cover illustration for the Taste section of the Twin Cities Star Tribune is all about finding the perfect pairings of food and drink.

Michael Gelen: Chris Christie

Michael Gelen’s Inkwell Studios just finished cooking up this caricature of hardboiled New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, who may be heading for a great fall…

Graham Smith: Inside Business Top 100

Graham Smith was commissioned to illustrate the cover and interior portraits for Inside Business Magazine to accompany their feature story, “100 Most Influential Leaders” in the state of Ohio. Graham created portraits of the top seven.

Brian Taylor: 2014 Update (Already!)

Brian Taylor is off and running this year with a batch of illustrations for clients old and new. He shows once again why he is such a favorite of the Washington Post, with this portrait series for their Weekend section identifying the people who will transform DC.

Dan Bejar: CASE Siver Medal

Dan Bejar's cover for George Washington University has received a Silver Medal in the "Cover" category from CASE, the Council for Advancement and Support of Education 2013 awards.

James Fryer: VIN-X Fine Wine Investment

James Fryer created this clever brochure cover illustration for VIN-X, a fine wine investment company.  James was ultimately able to convey the “cash-to-cru” concept in a single sunny image; his sketch process, below, shows the path to this deceptively simple solution.

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Thomas Pitilli: Late to Class? Off to Court!

Thomas Pitilli’s cover for Fort Worth Weekly accompanies a feature on the harsh truancy laws in Texas.

Melinda Beck: The Frog Prince

Melinda Beck’s full page silhouette illustrates this week’s fiction for The New Yorker.

David Fullarton: Oakland Exhibition

David Fullarton’s antic, hyper-intuitive artwork will be on exhibit in “Things That Happened and Things We Made Up,” a three-person show opening next month at The Compound Gallery in Oakland, CA.

Jeanine Henderson: The Feather Chase

Jeanine Henderson combined a watercolor background texture with ink drawings of feathers, a silhouette horizon and hand lettering to create the cover of The Feather Chase, volume one in a new middle-grade mystery series.

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Jon Reinfurt: Siri Stole my Husband

Jon Reinfurt’s illustration for the latest issue of Diablo Magazine accompanies an article on the negative impact that smartphones have had on relationships, specifically marriage. Neuroscience proves that small amounts of dopamine gets released in your brain whenever you hear your phone “ping” with the promise of a new update…

NY Times Health & Science: January 21, 2014

Ispotters had some great looking work in today’s Science Times section. Joyce Hesselberth illustrated an article about rude doctor behavior, and what happens when the shoe is on the other foot:

Mark McGinnis: Buy-One-Give-One

Mark McGinnis illustrated the cover feature of Stanford Social Innovation Review for a story examining the “buy-one-give-one” retail model.  Not only is it a viable way to create both commercial and social value, but it’s a model of social entrepreneurship that is likely to increase in prevalence and power in the coming years.

Goni Montes: Best Advice

Goni Montes offers up sage wisdom from the shaman of the links in this illustration for Golf Magazine.

Aaron Meshon: Tools Rule!

Aaron Meshon is calling all tools to the workbench with his latest childrens’s book, “Tools Rule!” coming soon from Atheneum Books for Young Readers.

Chris Gash: The Magic Ratio

Chris Gash had zero time to produce a full page illustration for The Guardian UK, but somehow he made it work. The feature was about a psychology student who challenged the generally accepted “magic ratio” for predicting happiness and debunked the whole theory.

Merrill Rainey: Groundhog Day

Merrill Rainey’s fun puzzle page for the January/February issue of Jack & Jill Magazine is all about missing groundhogs and presidents past.

Mark McGinnis: Home Prices

Mark McGinnis illustrated a feature for the San Diego Union Tribune noting that home prices are on the rise again.

Stephan Walter: Solo Exhibition in London

Stephan Walter’s first major London exhibition will take place at the Coningsby Gallery, January 27 through February 7, 2014. The title of the show, “How to Cook Panda Bears without Losing Your Soul,” refers to Stephan's ability to work as an illustrator while still retaining his unique artistic vision.

Monday, January 20, 2014

Luciana Navarro Powell: Ladybug Puzzle

Luciana Navarro Powell's friendly ladybug artwork appears on a fun new mini shaped floor puzzle, produced by Crocodile Creek.

Davide Bonazzi: Locked Up for Life?

Davide Bonazzi’s illustration for The Boston Globe Magazine accompanies an article about juvenile justice reform.

Leon Mussche: Birth without Worries

Leon Mussche's peaceful website illustrations for Dutch birthing method Bevallen Zonder Zorgen (“birth without worries”) gallantly support the theory of a stress-free experience through intelligent preparation.  Childbirth, breastfeeding, baby toting… it’s all so simple and carefree!

Elvis Swift: Too Much of a Good Thing…

Elvis Swift says it all in this fanciful word-illustrated greeting card for Papyrus.

Jacob Thomas: Kitten & Puppy Bowl Games

Jacob Thomas reminds us with this crazy-cute illustration for Entertainment Weekly that Super Bowl Sunday is also time for the Kitten & Puppy Bowl Games!

Friday, January 17, 2014

Doug Chayka: Grabbing the Wolf's Tail

Doug Chayka’s illustration for an Op-Ed in the New York Times accompanies a piece arguing for a continued troop presence in Afghanistan. It quotes a local journalist in Gardez: “Fighting in Afghanistan is like grabbing a wolf’s tail… While you hold on, you’re worried it will bite you. But if you let go, you are sure it will bite you.”

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Goni Montes: Best Advice

Goni Montes' cover illustrations for Clive Barker’s Next Testament series from Boom! Studios are genuinely awesome, especially when viewed as a group:

John Tomac: Magical Putter

John Tomac’s illustrations for Grantland.com accompany an account of a “magic golf club” that seems destined to revolutionize the game of golf. Its creator, Dr. Essay Anne Vanderbilt, is an engineer whose previous work is said to included top-secret government projects like the B-2 Bomber.

Anne Wilson: Mac User Profile

Anne Wilson and her gorgeous illustrations are featured in the January issue of Mac User Magazine. The profile covers Anne’s artwork, process (both pre- and post- digital) and her inspiring work ethic: “Just do what you do.”

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Lara Tomlin: Bird Beak

Lara Tomlin set aside her trademark human subject matter to create this mesmerizing series, illustrating cross-sections of a bird beak, for Audubon Magazine.

Brucie Rosch: Elephant Rampage

Brucie Rosch has been on an elephant themed, GOP illustration rampage lately, inspired by the daily political news cycle.  Healthcare battles, leadership vacuum, heartless politicking… what’s next?

Jason Seiler: Bridgegate!

Jason Seiler weighs in on the escalating Chris Christie / George Washington Bridge debacle for the New York Observer this week.

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Steven Noble: École Polytechnique Logo

Steven Noble collaborated with design agency Agence Babel in Paris to create the new logo identity for the prestigious French Ecole Polytechnique. The logo was designed to represent the four branches of the French military under the Napoleonic era: infantry, artillery, navy, and cavalry.